Teen Bullying & Their Victims


What Are The Warning Signs

Post date: January 29, 2013.

by Frances M. Harding, Director, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention at SAMHSA


Teen Bullies & their victims

There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying�either being bullied or bullying others. Recognizing the warning signs is an important first step in taking action against bullying. Not all children who are bullied or are bullying others ask for help.

It is important to talk with children who show signs of being bullied or bullying others. These warning signs can also point to other issues or problems, such as depression or substance abuse. Talking to the child can help identify the root of the problem.

Signs a Child is Being Bullied

Look for changes in the child. However, be aware that not all children who are bullied exhibit warning signs.
Some signs that may point to a bullying problem are:

  • Unexplainable injuries

  • Lost or destroyed clothing, books, electronics, or jewelry

  • Frequent headaches or stomach aches, feeling sick or faking illness

  • Changes in eating habits, like suddenly skipping meals or binge eating. Kids may come home from school hungry because they did not eat lunch

  • Difficulty sleeping or frequent nightmares

  • Declining grades, loss of interest in schoolwork, or not wanting to go to school

  • Sudden loss of friends or avoidance of social situations

  • Feelings of helplessness or decreased self esteem

  • Self-destructive behaviors such as running away from home, harming themselves, or talking about suicide

Signs a Child is Bullying Others

kids who may be bullying others may exhibit certain behaviors such as:

    1. Get into physical or verbal fights

    2. Have friends who bully others

    3. Are increasingly aggressive

    4. Get sent to the principal�s office or to detention frequently

    5. Have unexplained extra money or new belongings

    6. Blame others for their problems

    7. Don�t accept responsibility for their actions

    8. Are competitive and worry about their reputation or popularity

Why don't kids ask for help?

Statistics from the 2008�2009 School Crime Supplement show that an adult was notified in only about a third of bullying cases. Kids don�t tell adults for many reasons:

  • Bullying can make a child feel helpless. Kids may want to handle it on their own to feel in control again. They may fear being seen as weak or a tattletale.

  • Kids may fear backlash from the kid who bullied them.

  • Bullying can be a humiliating experience. Kids may not want adults to know what is being said about them, whether true or false. They may also fear that adults will judge them or punish them for being weak.

  • Kids who are bullied may already feel socially isolated. They may feel like no one cares or could understand.

  • Kids may fear being rejected by their peers. Friends can help protect kids from bullying, and kids can fear losing this support.

A service of the StopBullying.gov, Stop Bullying Blog, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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